A Small NYC Apartment Has Expensive-Looking Furniture That’s More Affordable

A Small NYC Apartment Has Expensive-Looking Furniture That’s More Affordable

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Name: Khadija Gulzar and husband
Location: New York, New York
Type of home: Apartment
Size: 680 square feet
Years lived in: Almost a year

Tell us a little (or a lot) about your home and the people who live there: I’m a fashion designer who is currently dabbling in the social media world. I always get tons of compliments from my followers on the internet whenever I share snippets of my home. It’s my sanctuary, and I couldn’t be more grateful to be living in this big jungle of a city and making this apartment my home.

We moved into this apartment almost a year ago, and we fell in love the instant we set our eyes on it. The floor-to-ceiling windows bring in a lot of natural light, so there was very little we had to do to make it look inviting and cozy. I like to think of myself as a person who loves color and texture but also clean lines. I’ve tried to incorporate all those things in my apartment, and so far I think we have done a pretty great job. I don’t like clutter, but I also am a collector, so that’s been a tricky thing to achieve, but so far, so good.

What is your favorite room and why? My favorite room has to be the kitchen. We have an open kitchen and I’m absolutely in love with it. The floor-to-ceiling window in there brings in a lot of light and since I love to cook I genuinely enjoy being there.

Describe your home’s style in 5 words or less: Very inviting, cheerful, distinctive, cozy, personal

What’s the last thing you bought (or found!) for your home? We found a gorgeous beige sofa for our living room. We were enamored with the cloud couch from Restoration Hardware, but that’s a little pricey for us, so we couldn’t have been happier to discover this one from Valyou Furniture. I’ve been told I have an eye for pieces which look and feel expensive but are actually quite affordable. That’s one of my many hidden talents (hehe).

Any advice for creating a home you love? Stick to a budget. Expensive doesn’t have to be the best. Do your research and if you like something which seems pricey I can assure you you can find something similar if not the same at a much cheaper price and still have it look expensive.

This submission’s responses and photos were edited for length/size and clarity.

A Small New York Apartment Aces the Cozy, Neutral, and Airy Look

A Small New York Apartment Aces the Cozy, Neutral, and Airy Look

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Name: Tiffany Lanham
Location: Brooklyn, New York City
Type of home: Co-op
Size: 750 square feet
Time lived in: 3 weeks, owned

Tell us a little (or a lot) about your home and the people who live there: This home represents new beginnings for me. Last year during the pandemic, I was renting an apartment with an ex-boyfriend and we broke up halfway through the pandemic. I felt alone and not sure what was next for me, and I was not even sure if I was going to stay in New York. An opportunity came about for me to buy an apartment that needed a complete gut renovation. I took a chance, bought the apartment, and did the renovation. I started 2021 with a new place, job, and outlook on life.

I hate to sound cliche but I’m a single, Black, successful woman who moved to New York with a dream and I’ve been able to make it in the city. I’ve conquered and been successful in my career, I’m still looking for love, and finally was able to own my little slice of the city. My identity is all over this place. I have mostly Black art in my apartment. I’ve bought from artists that inspire me and I’ve bought pieces from my travels from places like Brazil, South Africa, and Portugal. I wanted this apartment to feel light and bright. I stuck with a neutral palette of white walls (specifically used Benjamin Moore’s Decorator’s White) and I wanted the color in my place to come from the furniture, art, plants, and different textures. Every piece in my home has a story. This is the smallest apartment I’ve had in New York and everything has to have a purpose.

Describe your home’s style in 5 words or less: Eclectic, cozy, modern, comfortable, and airy

What is your favorite room and why? My favorite room is the bathroom. It came out better than I expected. It’s a nod to the period of the building (Art Deco) but it still feels modern. I also love that I incorporated old family photos in the bathroom with vintage and modern art. I took a risk with the black wall in the bathroom but it goes perfectly with the black trim around the tile.

What’s the last thing you bought (or found!) for your home? The last thing I bought for my place was a “WC” name plate for the bathroom door from target. I love it! It reminds me so much of the way old public bathrooms were labeled.

Any advice for creating a home you love? Make sure you have a vision and know that everything may not always go your way. Renovating during the pandemic had its own set of challenges but I wouldn’t change it for the world. I love my place and I’m so glad I took the risk to purchase it.

This submission’s responses and photos were edited for length/size and clarity.

A NYC Apartment Is Small, But This Renter Has Optimized Every Inch

A NYC Apartment Is Small, But This Renter Has Optimized Every Inch

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Name: Maggie Antalek and one roommate
Location: Lower East Side — New York, NY
Type of home: Apartment
Size: 600 square feet
Years lived in: 1 year, renting

Tell us a little (or a lot) about your home and the people who live there: My name is Maggie, and I’m a creative director for an events company based in Greenwich Village. I am also an artist focusing mainly on watercolors! I moved from Astoria to the Lower East Side last year and have spent a lot of time making this spot feel like home with items I have collected from overseas trips, art I have made or purchased, and items I have thrifted or bought cheap to redo/DIY at home to make them work with my aesthetic.

I would say I have made my apartment look and feel like a fantastic home without the huge price tag. With a little work and creativity, anyone can do it! It’s a small space, but I have optimized every area for storage and adding shelving. I also have TONS of plants for aesthetic purposes, but also for air quality while we are now working from home.

What is your favorite room and why? My bedroom, for sure! My windows get the most amazing sunlight all day, and especially in the evenings. I am on the fifth floor with no tall building directly across the street so it’s bright and sunny in my room. I created a cozy nook with a reading chair near the window, a gallery wall of artwork that’s special to me, DIY pillowcases on my bed, and most importantly, I painted a mural on my large, plain white wall. [Since this house call’s publication, it looks like Maggie paints murals for others, too!]

Describe your home’s style in 5 words or less: Eclectic, bohemian, worldly, cozy, colorful

What’s the last thing you bought (or found!) for your home? I found an awesome storage ottoman to hold purses below my coat hangers! The perfect spot to perch to put on shoes before heading out the door.

Any advice for creating a home you love? STORAGE SPACE, COLLECTABLES, AND PLANTS! It’s so important to have ample storage so everything has a place and nothing becomes “clutter.” Collecting items like artwork, pillows, or rugs can add a sentimental value to your home and remind you of your experiences while enriching your space. Plants add color to your home even if you stick to neutrals, bring life into your space, and create an environment that is nurturing.

This submission’s responses were edited for length and clarity.

New York’s First LGBTQ+ Museum Is In the Works

New York’s First LGBTQ+ Museum Is In the Works

As the birthplace to the LGBTQ+ liberation and pride movements in the U.S., New York City has always been rich in queer history and culture, but at long last, there will be a dedicated museum to the many trailblazers who have helped paved the way towards equality and freedom for all. The New-York Historical Society is adding 70,000 square feet to its building at Central Park West, creating a permanent home for the The American LGBTQ+ Museum, a collection of classrooms, galleries, study areas, and a state-of-the-art compact storage facility dedicated to preserving, researching, and sharing global, national, and local LGBTQ+ history and culture.

Slated to open in 2024, the museum will the first of its kind in New York City dedicated to LGBTQ+ history and stories, and it aims to envision “a world in which all people work toward and experience the joy of liberation.” The museum will not only illuminate LGBTQ+ history, but will also “preserve artifacts, personal stories, and intangible heritage that are being lost every day; educate our communities on the evolving, complex, and sometimes internally contentious narratives of LGBTQ+ history; provide a physical space for LGBTQ+ people that fosters individual dignity and unifies across generations and differences; and support a new generation of activists to advance social change,” per the museum’s mission statement.

Plans were set in motion back in 2017 after a year-long study of more than 3,200 LGBTQ+ people nationwide — including historians, academics, activists, social service providers, students, museum professionals, archivists, writers, and the general public across as many demographic intersections as possible — sought out to determine the desires for queer folks who are often overlooked by other LGBTQ+ facing institutions, including people of color and those who don’t conform to the gender binary. The museum will aim to live by its “stated values of inclusivity, intersectionality, transparency, and collaboration,” inspiring and educating all who visit the welcoming space, either in person or virtually.

“We’re delighted to partner with New York’s foremost museum of history to build a new museum dedicated to an exploration and celebration of the richness and diversity of LGBTQ+ history and culture in America,” said Richard Burns, chair, board of directors, The American LGBTQ+ Museum, in a press release announcing the plans. “The respect and rigor with which New-York Historical has approached this process, including their consultation with local communities, mirrors our own commitment to building a thoughtful, welcoming, queer, and inclusive experience for our visitors and partners. We look forward to bringing a dynamic new museum to life within this cherished, deeply-respected, and growing New York City landmark.”

While the physical space is already under construction, the museum has begun hosting free virtual events. The museum will offer traditional exhibits as well as interactive digital events, with Burns telling NBC News, “Culture can be a mirror, and people who feel invisible in the larger culture, they want a mirror that reflects back their lives, their stories, and confirms that we exist. What we’re hoping is to experiment with approaches to a museum so that people feel like they do belong there, that they do feel welcome — and that might require a lot of different kinds of approaches.”

Organizers also plan to collaborate with LGBTQ+ centered groups and organizations in order to create an in-depth, inclusive haven for visitors of all identities. As New-York Historical Society President and CEO Louise Mirrer told NBC News, “It underscores the fact that history is about agency — it’s not about a long dead past that no one can interrogate. This particular story of the American LGBTQ+ movement is one that needs to be recorded and preserved for future generations. The exciting part of this is that New York’s oldest museum is at the forefront of ensuring that history has a future.”

Arielle Tschinkel

Contributor

Arielle Tschinkel is a freelance pop culture and lifestyle writer whose work has appeared on Shape.com, WomansWorld.com, FirstforWomen.com, Insider, HelloGiggles, and more. She loves all things Disney and is making her way to every park around the world, and is a die-hard Britney Spears fan for life. She’s also obsessed with her Bernedoodle, Bruce Wayne.

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Here’s Where the New “Gossip Girl” Characters Live Now Compared to the Original Series

Here’s Where the New “Gossip Girl” Characters Live Now Compared to the Original Series

Gossip Girl” is back, and so are the lofty homes that made the original show so famous. After the reboot’s HBO Max premiere on July 8, viewers have a clearer idea about the who’s who of this latest group of elites, including their updated digs.

So much has evolved since the first cast took the city by storm, beginning with the neighborhoods (more broadly, the boroughs) they reside in. Where do the new “Gossip Girl” characters live compared to the OGs, and what does that say about how NYC has changed since the nine years the initial series ended? That’s a secret I’ll never tell (just kidding, let’s dive in).

Max Wolfe, aka the new Chuck Bass

Starting with party boy Max Wolfe, otherwise known as Chuck Bass 2.0., his townhouse is located in the West Village of Manhattan, filled with exposed-brick and antique furniture. In contrast, Chuck’s penthouse suite at The Empire Hotel on the Upper West Side was a brooding bachelor pad, with low lighting and a dark color palette. Max’s Greenwich Village home is warm, playful, and cozy — quite the opposite of Chuck’s upper Manhattan home. Who knows, maybe the location change implies he’s a more easygoing bad boy this time around?

Julien Calloway, aka the new Serena van der Woodsen

As the self-proclaimed it-girl of the series, Julien Calloway’s lavish, high-rise penthouse continues the tradition passed down by Serena van der Woodsen. Instead of the Upper East Side, however, she’s moved to trendy TriBeCa, in a sprawling space (which Locations Manager Matthew Kania confirms is The Beekman Residences) that doesn’t lack any of the luxe finishes. Though more modern-minimalist than Serena’s residence, the apartment — with an address in one of the most expensive neighborhoods in NYC — is exactly what we’d expect from Constance Billard’s reigning queen bee.

Zoya Lott, aka the new Jenny Humphrey

Zoya, Julien’s younger half-sister, fulfills the typical “outsider” role. After convincing her father to migrate from Buffalo to NYC, she moves into an airy apartment on the Upper West Side. Zoya is different from her wealthy peers, just like Dan and Jenny Humphrey, and her address doesn’t seem to help (as the only one living on the UWS, is this the “outcast” area like Brooklyn was in the first series?). Still, whether she and Julien erupt in a Serena-and-Blair-style showdown will arguably depend more on their complicated family history than anything else.

Obie Bergmann, aka the new Nate Archibald

Later in the episode, we also get a better glimpse at Obie Bergmann’s spacious loft located in Dumbo, Brooklyn. It’s a ways away from his archetype Nate Archibald’s stately Upper East Side townhouse, but that just speaks to the increased appeal of Dumbo and Brooklyn at large since the original series premiered in 2007. Without making him an outsider, Obie’s contemporary Brooklyn loft contrasts the original show, where almost everyone lived on the UES.

Now that it’s no longer passé to cross the bridge, if the series premiere is any indication of what’s to come, the new “Gossip Girl” characters will likely spend a lot of time outside of the Upper East Side.