This Woodstock House Has Bricked Archways and Gorgeous Green Cabinets

This Woodstock House Has Bricked Archways and Gorgeous Green Cabinets

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Name: Ayanna Barton, partner, and 6-year-old daughter
Location: Woodstock, New York
Type of home: House
Size: 2700 square feet
Years lived in: 6 years, owned

Tell us a little (or a lot) about your home and the people who live there: Our Woodstock house is a second home. It’s our little escape from New York City living. My family consists of my 6-year-old daughter, my husband, and myself. I have a large immediate family of five sisters with tons of nieces and nephews, so they come up to enjoy when time permits. When we are not at the house, we allow travelers to rent the house.

I love color. I wanted the house to be classic and timeless while also being a little adventurous with colors and themes in rooms like the beach bedroom or Audrey’s room. The pink library and the green den.

Describe your home’s style in 5 words or less: Classic Color Archways Timeless Fun

What is your favorite room and why? I love the entire house. However, since renovating the kitchen and dining room (which was always a wish list item since purchasing the house), it has become the center of the home. The ceilings were particularly low in these rooms and had a textured ceiling, which only made it feel more enclosed. Once the ceilings were raised and the wall separating the dining room from the kitchen was removed, the space felt so much bigger and airy. I wanted to have green cabinets but not a subtle, moody green but something bright but not overwhelming. I’m really happy with the color I found at Sherwin Williams, “Cloverfields.”

What’s the last thing you bought (or found!) for your home? The end chairs and bar stools for the dining room table and countertop. I bought both at Wayfair.

Any advice for creating a home you love? Stay true to your vision but remember functionality. While designing the kitchen, I was very conscious about the functionality of such an important space, especially since I did not use any professional design help. I spent months planning out the layout and made a lot of changes along the way even once the construction started. I had to change contractors at the last minute (two weeks before the original start date). It was very stressful but one of the best decisions I made during the renovation.

If you know you are not vibing with your contractor, do not ignore that feeling. My original contractors didn’t listen to me and the prices continued to increase while my design was being compromised. In the end, I was very lucky to find an amazing contractor who was able to squeeze my project into his schedule. I not only saved money but alternated my design to include other rooms, like replacing the tile floors in the hallway and entryway and parquet floors in the living room.

This submission’s responses and photos were edited for length/size and clarity.

Melding Muted Colours Into Modern Decor

Melding Muted Colours Into Modern Decor

How do you incorporate interesting colour accents into interiors without it becoming distractingly dazzling? Well, these three modern home interiors set the tone just right with a multitude of muted colour shades that add uplifting accents without provoking a headache. We look first at a Russian competition entry that features a colour coded home layout to define each living block. Our second featured interior is a home fit for a creative mind, with a well equipped music area and a gallery of KAWs statues that take over the living room. Lastly we look at a daring home design that delves into geometric pattern whilst pushing back hues into the muted spectrum.

Recommended Reading:  Chilled Out Modern Home in Muted Colour

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Benjamin Moore’s 2022 Color of the Year Is Here, and Yes, It’s Another Green

Benjamin Moore’s 2022 Color of the Year Is Here, and Yes, It’s Another Green

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Benjamin Moore just announced their Color of the Year for 2022, and it’s October Mist (1495), a soft, gently-shaded sage. Approachable and grounded, Benjamin Moore says the color is dreamy, but also the perfect canvas for getting creative with and layering upon a bevy of other nature-inspired hues.

“As the spaces in our homes continue to evolve, we uncover more opportunities to express our individuality and leverage the power of color to design environments that serve different functions and styles,” said Andrea Magno, Benjamin Moore’s director of color marketing and development, in a press release about the announcement. “October Mist (1495) and the corresponding Color Trends 2022 palette reflect an effortless harmony of colors, while inspiring unique combinations for any paint project.”

If you’ve been keeping track of COTY announcements for next year (we have!), then you might realize this hue is the fifth (yes, fifth!) shade of green to get the “Color of the Year” nod from a major paint company for 2022. So if you needed any more convincing to go green at home, then this just might be the sign you were waiting for.

As in years past, Benjamin Moore’s Color of the Year fits into a larger palette, with each shade working well together and/or as a stand-alone hue. For 2022, the jumping-off point for the palette was a botanical study. October Mist (1495) is comparable to the silver-green of a flower stem, and several other flora-derived shades build off of it, from Wild Flower (2090-40), which is the pinky-orange red shown at the bottom of this page, to Hint of Violet (2114-60), a soft lilac shade. Of course, the palette includes a few key whites and creams: Steam (AF-15), Morning Dew (OC-140), and Natural Linen (966). There’s also a mellow light yellow in the range, Pale Moon (OC-108), as well as several other darker greens, including Fernwood Green (2145-40), High Park (467), and Gloucester Sage (HC-100).

Any of the palette’s 14 colors could work throughout your home, from main living areas and kitchens to bathrooms, bedrooms, and even outdoor spaces, according to Benjamin Moore. You can visit your local Benjamin Moore dealer to see the chips up close or to purchase sample pots, quarts, and gallons in many of the company’s formulas. Benjamin Moore is also selling a limited edition swatch kit that features the 14 chips and votive candles rendered in three of this year’s colors for $25.00.

Danielle Blundell

Home Editor

Danielle Blundell is AT’s Home Director and covers decorating and design. She loves homes, heels, the history of art, and hockey—but not necessarily always in that order.

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Each Room in This Brooklyn Apartment Is a Nod to a Distinct Era of Art History

Each Room in This Brooklyn Apartment Is a Nod to a Distinct Era of Art History

Erin Derby

Photographer

Originally from California, but turned New Yorker since 2000, I’ve been shooting my entire life and am still inspired and excited about it. Lately I have been putting my energies into my Fine Art, which can be seen on my website and on Saatchi Art. Being infatuated with interior design doesn’t hurt either, which mixes well with my love of photographing interiors.

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This Actor’s NYC Apartment Is Dripping With Drama, Dark Colors & Other Delights

This Actor’s NYC Apartment Is Dripping With Drama, Dark Colors & Other Delights

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Name: Charles Busch
Location: West Village — New York City, New York
Type of Home: A duplex co-op apartment
Size: 1000 square feet
Years lived in: 26 years, owned

Charles Busch wears many hats (and wigs). He’s a playwright, actor, director, novelist, drag legend, and cabaret entertainer, and for 26 years he’s turned this West Village apartment into a home absolutely dripping with drama, details, and delightful decor elements. Dark colors, rich wallpaper patterns, and interesting art adorn many of the home’s walls, including a unique, statement arch in his bedroom, a result of when Charles and his architect worked on the space around 19 years ago.

“My duplex is a combining of two studio apartments,” Charles explains. “I bought the upstairs apartment seven years after I bought the downstairs. My architect/designer, August Ventura, had an enormous challenge, finding the best position for the staircase, creating new closets, and giving each floor its own individual layout, because both studios had identical floor plans. He solved the latter problem by creating a dramatic arch dividing two halves of the bedroom.”

Along with the unique architectural elements of his home, Charles’ apartment also has an obvious theatricality to it, no doubt a result of being in theater and film for so many years. But the influence goes both ways: His apartment recently served as inspiration for the upcoming movie “The Sixth Reel,” which he wrote while stuck inside during the pandemic and Skyping with his creative partner, director Carl Andress. The film, which also stars Margaret Cho and Tim Daly, centers around a cadre of film buffs passionate about Hollywood artifacts, and it’s not hard to imagine how living among so many beautiful ones might have inspired the plot.

Apartment Therapy Survey:

My Style: Golden Age Hollywood/19th century Parisian bordello. Or perhaps how a 19th  century Parisian bordello would be designed in a 1940s Hollywood Technicolor movie.

Inspiration: The 19th century French actress Sarah Bernhardt’s Paris home; the 1958 Vincente Minnelli film “Gigi”; Diana Vreeland’s red living room designed by Billy Baldwin; the 1940s interior design work of Dorothy Draper; the work of 1920s set designer Natasha Rambova; and Disneyland’s “Pirates of the Caribbean” ride.

Favorite Element: When I was fourteen, I went to live with my Aunt Lil in her Manhattan apartment. She had wonderful taste in decor; a mixture of mid-century modern and French and Chinese influences. When I landed in my current apartment in the Village, I took her design aesthetic and multiplied it by ten. I see her influences everywhere, from the round table by the window, draped in layers of fabric and covered with photos of family and friends, to her living room baroque wall sconces that I painted pearlized white and hung in my bedroom. Having these elaborate sconces give my bedroom something of the feeling of the Jean Cocteau film of “Beauty and the Beast.” 

Most of all, I’m pleased that my apartment can be viewed as a complete expression of my personality. After a study of each room, you would know just about everything important about me; my romanticism, my pragmatic nature, my artistic influences, the people I love, and my creative life. My latest project is a film, “The Sixth Reel,” that I co-wrote and directed with my longtime friend and colleague Carl Andress. The protagonist, who I also play in the film, is a collector of classic film memorabilia. Many of the scenes in the movie took place in his West Village apartment.  Although “Jimmy” is quite different than me, we share the same interests and the production designer, Dara Wishingrad, raided my home for books, bibelots, and even extra rolls of wallpaper to create Jimmy’s cluttered eccentric apartment.

Biggest Challenge: My duplex is a combining of two studio apartments. I bought the upstairs apartment seven years after I bought the downstairs. My architect/designer August Ventura, had an enormous challenge, finding the best position for the staircase, creating new closets, and giving each floor its own individual layout, because both studios had identical floor plans. He solved the latter problem by creating a dramatic arch dividing two halves of the bedroom. The arch that reveals my bed has the feel of a theatrical proscenium. I could probably fit two rows of seats in front of it. One of these days I’ll give a benefit performance of “Sorry Wrong Number,” which is a solo play that takes place in a woman’s Manhattan boudoir.  

Proudest DIY: Every few years, when I’m experiencing writer’s block and unable to get my real work done, I find myself turning to crafts. I loved making this bust of the Byzantine Empress Theodora. I used a Styrofoam wig head as a base. Taking as a base a plaster life mask that a friend made of me in the seventies, I created a papier mache mask, painted the face on it, then covered the face with a silk stocking and painted the red lips over that. I was able to use a headdress that the designer B T Whitehill made for me to wear when I played Theodora with my theater company in the East Village in the eighties. It needed more, more, more, so I bought dozens of antique jeweled brooches on eBay and covered every bit of the head except for the face. It’s an art project I’m very proud of.

Biggest Indulgence: I spent a large part of my adolescence at the Lincoln Center Library of Performing Arts. For hours after school, I’d pour over the scrapbooks of the legendary female stars of the theater. The one who particularly fascinated me was the French actress Sarah Bernhardt. An actress, playwright, director, sculptor, painter, she was the first international celebrity. Her life and career have without a doubt been a profound inspiration for me. As a teenager, I had in my bedroom a $4.95 reproduction of the artist Alphonse Mucha’s Art Nouveau poster of Bernhardt in the play “Gismonda.” For decades, I dreamed of owning the original. Finally, around seventeen years ago, it came up for auction. I had never been to an auction, so I took my friend Kathie. I figured I could afford the estimated price. Well, the first bid went over the estimate. After each competitive bid, Kath and I went into a frenzied conference. With the price more than double the estimate, at long last it was mine. The elderly British auctioneer murmured into the microphone. “I’m very glad you got this.”

Is there something unique about your home or the way you use it? I removed the kitchen on the first-floor apartment and turned the space into a home office. A small Manhattan kitchen was transformed into a perfectly satisfactory office.

What are your favorite products you have bought for your home and why? I try to use Seventh Generation natural cleaning products. Not so much for me, but for my friend Kathie, who is my 24/7 computer tech support and also wig stylist for all of my plays for the past forty years. Kathie is violently allergic to all chemicals, so for her I use Seventh Generation cleaning products.  

Please describe any helpful, inspiring, brilliant, or just plain useful small space maximizing and/or organizing tips you have: Don’t be afraid of making bold design choices for small rooms. It’s impossible to make a tiny room look big, so embrace it and go wild with saturated color and pattern upon pattern.

Finally, what’s your absolute best home secret or decorating advice? Your home is a visual autobiography. Express your unique personality with every choice.

“This resource list is unfortunately not applicable since I did the renovation of my apartment nearly twenty years ago and I wasn’t involved in the minutia of the painting and construction. I gave my architect/designer August Ventura imagery and concepts and he turned it into a fabulous reality.”

This house tour’s responses were edited for length and clarity.

Adrienne Breaux

House Tour Editor

Adrienne loves architecture, design, cats, science fiction and watching Star Trek. In the past 10 years she’s called home: a van, a former downtown store in small town Texas and a studio apartment rumored to have once been owned by Willie Nelson.

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