Outdoor Kitchen Design Ideas: WWOO Outdoor Concrete Kitchen

Outdoor Kitchen Design Ideas: WWOO Outdoor Concrete Kitchen

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen is a low maintenance concrete kitchen that can be customised to meet your needs

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen is a low maintenance concrete kitchen that can be customised to meet your needs

Enjoy Al Fresco dining this Summer with an outdoor concrete kitchen

How nice is the weather at the moment? Admittedly, it is more than a little worrying that we are seeing the hottest temperatures since records began and I’m sure that a hosepipe ban is imminent here in the South West. Whilst it has been ever so lovely to spend time in my garden, our decking is such a sun trap and by mid-afternoon, it’s almost too hot to sit outside. We have recently installed a shade sail to provide some shade for the kids, but it hasn’t really helped if I’m honest.

Summer Al fresco Dining

This photo above pretty much sums up what we did the whole weekend (obviously this isn’t us). We had a lunchtime BBQ with friends on Saturday followed by another BBQ for dinner on Saturday evening. Then on Sunday, we had yet another BBQ! It was a weekend full of sunshine, great company, fantastic food and generally feeling really grateful that we have such an amazing outdoor space to use.

However, all that sunshine and time in the garden did mean that my mind was buzzing with more updates that we could make to the garden to make it even more practical. The problem is we live in a first-floor flat and the garden is obviously on the ground floor. So al fresco dining inevitably involves a lot of running up and down the stairs to the kitchen to get food and drinks from the fridge and to collect everything we need for entertaining.

We have installed a small drinks fridge in the garden, but I’ve been dreaming of extending our brick shed so that we can store more equipment in the garden. I also can’t help but think how great it would be to have an outdoor kitchen. I’m not talking about anything too fancy here. Nothing like they have in America or Australia. There would be no point given how bad the weather generally is in the UK. But something simple that would provide plenty of storage and surface space would be ideal.

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen is made from concrete segments

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen is made from concrete segments

Modular Outdoor Kitchen

Something pretty much (read exactly) like the amazing WWOO outdoor kitchen. WWOO is a Dutch-designed modular concrete outdoor kitchen by Piet-Jan van den Kommer. The design is so simple but there are a number of customisation options on offer which allow you to design and install an outdoor kitchen that meets all your needs and works for your garden. You can add a Big Green Egg charcoal BBQ, an integrated fireplace or a braai, a sink, wooden storage boxes, and even wooden cutting boards.

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen can be customised to fit the requirements of your garden

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen can be customised to fit the requirements of your garden

Outdoor Concrete Kitchen

The outdoor concrete kitchen comes in three heights (1.3m, 1.65m, or 2m) and also has a degree of flexibility when it comes to length (the segments come in 1.5m lengths). Plus it’s super hard wearing, durable and weather-proof as it’s made from concrete. The maintenance is probably very minimal too. The only disadvantage I can see is the price (admittedly it is a tad expensive!) but given how long it will last, I personally think this is an investment worth making.

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen is a durable, hard wearing and weather proof garden solution

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen is a durable, hard wearing and weather proof garden solution

Now tell me you don’t want this outdoor concrete kitchen in your garden too?

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen comes in 1.5m concrete segments

WWOO outdoor concrete kitchen comes in 1.5m concrete segments

Just in case you’re now desperate to order yourself a WWOO outdoor kitchen, the company is headquartered in the Netherlands, but the outdoor kitchens are also available in Israel, Germany, the USA, Belgium and the UK (the offices are situated in St Albans in Hertfordshire).

I’ve already got the perfect space for one in my garden and now I’m going to be lusting after one all summer. My husband is already sick of hearing about it!

Today’s Homeowner Radio Podcast | July 23, 2022

Today’s Homeowner Radio Podcast | July 23, 2022


Hour 1

In Hour 1 of the Today’s Homeowner Radio Podcast, learn how to remove rusty bolts from concrete, get the most out of kitchen cabinet space and more.


Removing Rusty Bolts From Concrete

Rust can spread through concrete if you don’t eliminate or seal off the source. (Stolk, Getty Images Signature)

Cliff Dodd in Mobile, Ala., recently removed his pool diving board and pedestal base, but the severely rusty bolts are still embedded in the concrete.  

“When I took dive off, the bolts were three rusted mounds. I couldn’t differentiate between the nuts, bolts and washers,” he says.

He wants to know, is there a way to remove the bolts, and if not, what’s the best way to prevent these old bolts from rusting and having a rust stain on the concrete in the future?

Removing bolts from concrete can be tricky, because they were put there in the first place to stay put. To remove them, use a center punch tool to drill a hole in the middle of the bolt. Then, drill it out as much of the rusty bolt as you can. After that, use a hammer and cold chisel to crush what’s remaining of the bolt inward to get it below the surface. This way you’re not disturbing the concrete around it too much.

Another option is to grind the bolts down below the surface as much as you can. To do this, use a disc grinder, and make sure you wear safety gloves and glasses while doing it. Hone the grinder back and forth until the bolt is about a quarter-inch below the surface.

To prevent the rusted bolts from staining the concrete, spray or brush on two to three coats of metal primer over the rusted bolt. This will seal off the rust and keep it from spreading into the concrete. To keep the paint from getting onto the concrete surface, cut a hole that’s the same size as the bolt in a paper plate and place it over the bolt area.

Next, cover the holes with a concrete patch. The challenge when working with existing concrete is getting the patch to match. For a uniform look, apply a concrete resurfacer over the entire slab.


Getting the Most Out of Your Cabinet Space

Hand opening a kitchen cabinet
Pull-out shelves prevent an avalanche of Tupperware when you open cabinets. (sirawitt99, Getty Images)

Dorene in Pennsylvania needs some advice on her kitchen cabinet storage. 

She has pull-out shelves in her base cabinets, but half of them are broken. She’s ready to just remove them and install permanent half shelves. 

Our advice: Don’t install stationary shelves; repair or replace the pull-out shelves.

When you look at the cubic feet of storage in a cabinet, you’re only using about 50 percent of it with stationary half shelves. 

With a full pull-out shelf, you can use the most space and still have easy access to your items. 

Repairing the pull-out shelves could be as simple as replacing the slides. Purchase new slides through the manufacturer.  

To utilize even more cabinet space, consider installing a new pull-out shelf configuration. Home Depot offers many pull-out options, from corner cabinet pullouts to spice racks and more. 

Before buying, take careful measurements of the depth and width of a cabinet. Retrofitted pieces of hardware are only expandable to a certain degree. 


Hour 2

In Hour 2, we talk about the pros and cons of peel-and-stick wallpaper, the best paint for hardwood floors and more.


Pros and Cons of Peel-and-Stick Wallpaper

Roll of wallpaper sticking to wall
Peel-and-stick wallpaper is a temporary way to add style to a room. (asbe, Getty Images Signature)

Peel-and-stick wallpaper is perfect for renters or homeowners who like to change their interior design often.

Because the adhesive is already applied, you don’t have to worry about making a mess with paste.    

Before buying peel-and-stick wallpaper, consider the following:

Price: Prices for peel-and-stick wallpaper can vary. The cheaper it is, it will probably be more difficult to hang it smoothly. If you’re on a budget and going with the lowest price point, consider just using it for an accent wall. Also, keep in mind that the cheaper adhesive might damage your wall.

The higher in price you go, the easier the application and stronger the hold will be. Also, the more expensive types are easier to remove and leave behind less residue.

Location: Before putting up peel-and-stick wallpaper, take the room into consideration. A bathroom is very humid, so you need wallpaper with a strong adhesive. Otherwise, it might peel off by itself. 

Also, because peel-and-stick wallpaper is made from plastic, heat can melt it. Don’t install it near a stove or a fireplace. 

Our advice: Don’t buy the cheapest option. Buy mid-price peel-and-stick wallpaper and always check the reviews. If you find it costs the same as traditional wallpaper, you might as well hang regular wallpaper


Painting a Wood Floor

Paint roller on paint tray with white paint on wood floor
If you must paint a wood floor, be sure to prime it first. (mattjeacock, Getty Images)

Karen Pittman in Tennessee lives in an older home that needs new flooring. Her current floors are wood, but she says they’re not worth refinishing. 

“Until we can afford new flooring, is there a paint that will withstand the pitter patter of my 100-pound puppy’s little feet?” she asks.

We don’t often recommend painting a wood floor, but if it’s your only option, you need to use the right kind of paint. 

Behr Premium Low-Lustre Enamel Porch and Patio Floor Paint will hold up to the heavy foot traffic of that 100-pound “puppy.” An anti-slip option is also available. 

To paint the wood floors, prep it like you would any surface for painting and add a coat of primer. 

Read “Painting Wood Floors” for a detailed guide on how to do it. 


Red shade sail
A shade sail is a stylish way to seek shelter from the sun. (3 Echoes Content Studio)

Around The Yard

This time of year we spend more and more time outside. But for many of us It’s just downright HOT in July. So finding some shade for our outdoor living spaces is a priority. If you don’t just happen to have a perfectly positioned tree over your deck or patio, here are some ideas that may give you some relief from the Summer sun. 

A pergola or arbor is the first thing many people think about when they want shade, but most of these structures don’t actually provide much of it on their own. Those vertically oriented boards across the top of them look really cool but they only block the sun at just the right angle. However, if you plant some climbing vines around the perimeter of the structure, in time they’ll create a canopy over the arbor that provides plenty of shade.

If early morning or late afternoon sun is a problem in your favorite spot, you may get some relief from a vertical hanging screen. The big decision here is whether you want to be able to move the screen when the sun isn’t intruding. Lattice panels are great for fixed screens but for a movable option, you might consider a rolling screen that works much like a window shade on a larger scale. I’ve even seen people make shade curtains from drop cloths with some success.

But by far the easiest and most popular way to produce shade is by hanging a fabric shade sail over the space. These are available in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors depending on your situation. The important thing to consider here is the tie-down locations. Be sure they’re sturdy enough to support the shade in the wind and allow some way to re-tension it since it will inevitably begin to sag over time. 

This Around The Yard segment is brought to you by Quikrete and Pavestone.


Best New Products

Temperature display on the Nexgrill Neevo 720 Propane Gas Digital Smart Grill A smart grill takes the guesswork out of grilling. See why this new technology can make your barbecue better than ever. Learn more >>

Simple Solutions

Spray bottle spraying ammonia into outdoor trash can
Ammonia not only disinfects trash cans, but it also repels critters. (3 Echoes Content Studio)

Pest-Proof Your Garbage Cans — Fill a spray bottle with ammonia and spray the outside of your garbage cans to repel raccoons, dogs and other critters from knocking over and rummaging through your trash. Also, liberally spray the ammonia on the ground around the garbage cans. 

Watch: Tip for Disinfecting Outdoor Trash Can

DIY drywall pole sander made from a sponge mop
Converting a sponge mop into a pole sander can save you from stretching. (3 Echoes Content Studio)

Improvised pole sander — A pole sander is great for sanding and smoothing lots of different surfaces, including walls, ceilings, decks and porches. However, if you don’t own a pole sander, you can make one from a sponge mop. Start by removing the sponge head from the mop and then wrap it in sandpaper. Screw the head back onto the mop and you’ve got a long-handled tool that’s ready for sanding.

Watch: Turn a Sponge Mop Into a Drywall Pole Sander


Other Products & Links Mentioned


Further Reading


Radio Show & Podcast: Send us your question!

If you have a comment, general question about home improvement, or something we’ve featured on Today’s Homeowner, please fill in this form:

The Today’s Homeowner Radio Podcast | July 23, 2022

The Today’s Homeowner Radio Podcast | July 23, 2022


Hour 1

In Hour 1 of the Today’s Homeowner Radio Podcast, learn how to remove rusty bolts from concrete, get the most out of kitchen cabinet space and more.

Removing Rusty Bolts From Concrete

Rust can spread through concrete if you don’t eliminate or seal off the source. (Stolk, Getty Images Signature)

Cliff Dodd in Mobile, Ala., recently removed his pool diving board and pedestal base, but the severely rusty bolts are still embedded in the concrete.  

“When I took dive off, the bolts were three rusted mounds. I couldn’t differentiate between the nuts, bolts and washers,” he says.

He wants to know, is there a way to remove the bolts, and if not, what’s the best way to prevent these old bolts from rusting and having a rust stain on the concrete in the future?

Removing bolts from concrete can be tricky, because they were put there in the first place to stay put. To remove them, use a center punch tool to drill a hole in the middle of the bolt. Then, drill it out as much of the rusty bolt as you can. After that, use a hammer and cold chisel to crush what’s remaining of the bolt inward to get it below the surface. This way you’re not disturbing the concrete around it too much.

Another option is to grind the bolts down below the surface as much as you can. To do this, use a disc grinder, and make sure you wear safety gloves and glasses while doing it. Hone the grinder back and forth until the bolt is about a quarter-inch below the surface.

To prevent the rusted bolts from staining the concrete, spray or brush on two to three coats of metal primer over the rusted bolt. This will seal off the rust and keep it from spreading into the concrete. To keep the paint from getting onto the concrete surface, cut a hole that’s the same size as the bolt in a paper plate and place it over the bolt area.

Next, cover the holes with a concrete patch. The challenge when working with existing concrete is getting the patch to match. For a uniform look, apply a concrete resurfacer over the entire slab.


Getting the Most Out of Your Cabinet Space

Hand opening a kitchen cabinet
Pull-out shelves prevent an avalanche of Tupperware when you open cabinets. (sirawitt99, Getty Images)

Dorene in Pennsylvania needs some advice on her kitchen cabinet storage. 

She has pull-out shelves in her base cabinets, but half of them are broken. She’s ready to just remove them and install permanent half shelves. 

Our advice: Don’t install stationary shelves; repair or replace the pull-out shelves.

When you look at the cubic feet of storage in a cabinet, you’re only using about 50 percent of it with stationary half shelves. 

With a full pull-out shelf, you can use the most space and still have easy access to your items. 

Repairing the pull-out shelves could be as simple as replacing the slides. Purchase new slides through the manufacturer.  

To utilize even more cabinet space, consider installing a new pull-out shelf configuration. Home Depot offers many pull-out options, from corner cabinet pullouts to spice racks and more. 

Before buying, take careful measurements of the depth and width of a cabinet. Retrofitted pieces of hardware are only expandable to a certain degree. 


Hour 2

In Hour 2, we talk about the pros and cons of peel-and-stick wallpaper, the best paint for hardwood floors and more.


Pros and Cons of Peel-and-Stick Wallpaper

Roll of wallpaper sticking to wall
Peel-and-stick wallpaper is a temporary way to add style to a room. (asbe, Getty Images Signature)

Peel-and-stick wallpaper is perfect for renters or homeowners who like to change their interior design often.

Because the adhesive is already applied, you don’t have to worry about making a mess with paste.    

Before buying peel-and-stick wallpaper, consider the following:

Price: Prices for peel-and-stick wallpaper can vary. The cheaper it is, it will probably be more difficult to hang it smoothly. If you’re on a budget and going with the lowest price point, consider just using it for an accent wall. Also, keep in mind that the cheaper adhesive might damage your wall.

The higher in price you go, the easier the application and stronger the hold will be. Also, the more expensive types are easier to remove and leave behind less residue.

Location: Before putting up peel-and-stick wallpaper, take the room into consideration. A bathroom is very humid, so you need wallpaper with a strong adhesive. Otherwise, it might peel off by itself. 

Also, because peel-and-stick wallpaper is made from plastic, heat can melt it. Don’t install it near a stove or a fireplace. 

Our advice: Don’t buy the cheapest option. Buy mid-price peel-and-stick wallpaper and always check the reviews. If you find it costs the same as traditional wallpaper, you might as well hang regular wallpaper


Painting a Wood Floor

Paint roller on paint tray with white paint on wood floor
If you must paint a wood floor, be sure to prime it first. (mattjeacock, Getty Images)

Karen Pittman in Tennessee lives in an older home that needs new flooring. Her current floors are wood, but she says they’re not worth refinishing. 

“Until we can afford new flooring, is there a paint that will withstand the pitter patter of my 100-pound puppy’s little feet?” she asks.

We don’t often recommend painting a wood floor, but if it’s your only option, you need to use the right kind of paint. 

Behr Premium Low-Lustre Enamel Porch and Patio Floor Paint will hold up to the heavy foot traffic of that 100-pound “puppy.” An anti-slip option is also available. 

To paint the wood floors, prep it like you would any surface for painting and add a coat of primer. 

Read “Painting Wood Floors” for a detailed guide on how to do it. 


Red shade sail
A shade sail is a stylish way to seek shelter from the sun. (3 Echoes Content Studio)

Around The Yard

This time of year we spend more and more time outside. But for many of us It’s just downright HOT in July. So finding some shade for our outdoor living spaces is a priority. If you don’t just happen to have a perfectly positioned tree over your deck or patio, here are some ideas that may give you some relief from the Summer sun. 

A pergola or arbor is the first thing many people think about when they want shade, but most of these structures don’t actually provide much of it on their own. Those vertically oriented boards across the top of them look really cool but they only block the sun at just the right angle. However, if you plant some climbing vines around the perimeter of the structure, in time they’ll create a canopy over the arbor that provides plenty of shade.

If early morning or late afternoon sun is a problem in your favorite spot, you may get some relief from a vertical hanging screen. The big decision here is whether you want to be able to move the screen when the sun isn’t intruding. Lattice panels are great for fixed screens but for a movable option, you might consider a rolling screen that works much like a window shade on a larger scale. I’ve even seen people make shade curtains from drop cloths with some success.

But by far the easiest and most popular way to produce shade is by hanging a fabric shade sail over the space. These are available in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors depending on your situation. The important thing to consider here is the tie-down locations. Be sure they’re sturdy enough to support the shade in the wind and allow some way to re-tension it since it will inevitably begin to sag over time. 

This Around The Yard segment is brought to you by Quikrete and Pavestone.


Best New Products

Temperature display on the Nexgrill Neevo 720 Propane Gas Digital Smart Grill A smart grill takes the guesswork out of grilling. See why this new technology can make your barbecue better than ever. Learn more >>

Simple Solutions

Spray bottle spraying ammonia into outdoor trash can
Ammonia not only disinfects trash cans, but it also repels critters. (3 Echoes Content Studio)

Pest-Proof Your Garbage Cans — Fill a spray bottle with ammonia and spray the outside of your garbage cans to repel raccoons, dogs and other critters from knocking over and rummaging through your trash. Also, liberally spray the ammonia on the ground around the garbage cans. 

Watch: Tip for Disinfecting Outdoor Trash Can

DIY drywall pole sander made from a sponge mop
Converting a sponge mop into a pole sander can save you from stretching. (3 Echoes Content Studio)

Improvised pole sander — A pole sander is great for sanding and smoothing lots of different surfaces, including walls, ceilings, decks and porches. However, if you don’t own a pole sander, you can make one from a sponge mop. Start by removing the sponge head from the mop and then wrap it in sandpaper. Screw the head back onto the mop and you’ve got a long-handled tool that’s ready for sanding.

Watch: Turn a Sponge Mop Into a Drywall Pole Sander


Other Products & Links Mentioned


Further Reading


Radio Show & Podcast: Send us your question!

If you have a comment, general question about home improvement, or something we’ve featured on Today’s Homeowner, please fill in this form:

51 Concrete Decor Items That Create An Interesting Industrial Aesthetic

51 Concrete Decor Items That Create An Interesting Industrial Aesthetic

Concrete decor elements, large or small, install an edgy dash of style into a home interior. Most synonymous with the industrial aesthetic, concrete accessories also befit minimalist spaces, boho schemes, Scandi interiors, the vintage look, and modern farmhouse decor. This cool material can take a standard room design to a new level with either raw and rugged finishes or high polish. If you’re not ready to take a deep dive into the world of concrete with wall cladding and floor screed, then this varied collection of 51 concrete decor items provides plenty of inspiration on how to inject an interesting industrial aesthetic just a little at a time.

Weekend Project: Make These Large-Scale Modern Concrete Planters

Weekend Project: Make These Large-Scale Modern Concrete Planters

This tutorial will guide you through all the steps to making your own, large-scale DIY concrete planters at home. 

DIY large scale concrete planters

This summer, we moved into a new studio space on a bustling avenue that cuts right through the heart of St. Paul and Minneapolis. We love it; our huge floor-to-ceiling-windows look out into the sun-filled street and sidewalks where we can watch the light-rail trains go rolling by. But the people looking back at us don’t have as much to look at; our storefront is still looking a little shabby and unloved. So we decided to start out office transformation from the outside in: with a few large-scale DIY concrete planters.

These planters are easy to make

Ahh… concrete. It’s kind of a miracle substance. Look around, and you’ll start to notice that practically everything is made of concrete. It’s strong, durable, infinitely moldable, easy to work with, and looks oh so sharp!

We partnered with Quikrete for this project, so we wanted to try out their countertop concrete mix, which has an additive that lets the mixed concrete flow and consolidate better at a lower water-to-cement ratio. It’s great for, duh, countertops, but also any other concrete project where you want a really nice finish.
A smooth finish and texture

For this project, we wanted to build some planters that were large and impressive. They’re going to go out on the street in front of our office, where lots of people will see them. And we didn’t want to just go to the big box hardware store and buy a few faux Tuscan jobs; where’s the fun in that?! This is a DIY site, and it wouldn’t do to have some generic store-bought planters sitting in front of our HQ.

So we came up with the idea of using concrete footing tubes … you know, those cardboard concrete tube forms you can use to make fence post footings? They’re perfect because they come in lots of sizes, and are easy to cut down to length. They make perfect concrete planter molds. We went with a basic cylinder-shaped planter; simple but stylish. Here’s how we did it:

[embedded content]

Materials

  • 3 – 80-lb. bags of Quikrete® Countertop Mix 
  • 3 Quikrete Quik-tube® building forms (16″, 12″ and 8″ diameters)
  • 2 PVC drain caps (2″ diameter)
  • 3 sheets of corrugated plastic, smooth-top
  • Non-stick cooking spray
  • Duct tape
  • Silicone caulk
  • 1 length 2″ PVC (we actually didn’t end up needing this)
  • 1 roll of wire mesh
  • Plastic garbage bag or sheeting
materials for DIY concrete planters
  • A large concrete mixing tray
  • A shovel (for mixing)
  • Caulking gun
  • A utility knife (or circular saw, optional)
  • A tape measure

How to Make Your Own DIY Concrete Planters

Step 1

Decide how tall you want your planter to be. We made our first one 24″ tall. Then mark that on the tube (in our case, I started with the 12″ diameter tube), and cut the tube at that length. You can use a sharp utility knife, or, to go faster, use a circular saw to carefully make the cut.

mark the cardboard tube molds
A person is using a red marker and a soft measuring tape to draw a line around a cylindrical object.
cut the molds to height

Step 2

To make the inside part of the form, mark your smaller tube at a length 1.75″ shorter than the first (this will account for the height of the PVC drain cap and also makes up the base of the planter. For example:

Our first planter was 12″ in diameter and 24″ in height. So our inner tube (8″ diameter) was cut to 22.25″ in height. 

Step 3

Now place the smaller tube (the one that will end up inside the larger one) on your plastic sheet and trace it. Then cut out that circle with a utility knife. This will be the base of the smaller tube.

cut the plastic base for the concrete mold

Step 4

Tape the plastic circle you just cut out to the bottom of the smaller tube, taping it neatly all the way around so that it won’t let concrete through.  Then wrap the whole cylinder in plastic, taping it on. This isn’t strictly necessary, but it’ll make the form easier to pull away from the concrete later. 

A pair of man hands taping a roll of black plastic with blue tape.

Step 5

Now place the PVC drain cap in the center of the cylinder’s plastic ‘lid’, and screw it in place. Now your interior form is ready to go. 

A person waving their hands over a blue and white object.
A man applies paint in the middle of a blue taped circle

Step 6

Place the smaller tube on top of a clean sheet of the corrugated plastic, with the ‘cap’ side up. You’ll adhere it to the plastic using the silicone caulk.

use caulk to seal the bottom of the mold

Don’t do this!
Believe it or not, we often make mistakes when doing DIY projects! Here’s something we tried that you shouldn’t: putting a wire mesh into the mold.  

A person lifting up a blue round item with a plastic cover.

I thought this would add strength to the planter. It probably would’ve, but it also made it really hard to get the concrete distributed evenly within the mold, and, honestly, it’s a planter … it’s not like anyone’s going to be standing on it. So, if I were you, I’d leave the wire mesh out … the planters will be plenty strong without it.

Here’s how the whole mold comes together:

DIY concrete planter molds diagram

Step 7

After spraying the interior tube with cooking spray, set the outside tube down around it and adhere it to the base with silicone caulk. Once the caulk has dried, your form is ready for concrete.

Step 8

Open a bag of Quikrete and mix it according to the directions on the back! I can’t stress this enough; unless you’re an expert concrete-mixer-guy/gal, just swallow your pride and follow the directions. Things will turn out much better. For a project like this, where a nice, even, smooth finish is most important, you want the concrete to be pretty wet (wetter even than it looks in my photos below). A wetter mix will flow into the form better and give a smoother, more even surface finish. 

A person puts a scoop of Quickpete into a pan.
A man mixing commercial grade concrete with water in a rectangular box
Cement is being mixed in a container on a blue tarp.

Step 9

Fill the form all the way to the top, making sure to pack the material in well (you can use a dowel to make sure it all gets in there).

At this point, you’ll want to vibrate the form with a rubber mallet, an orbital sander, or even a reciprocating saw (with the blade taken out). Vibration helps the concrete compact, eliminating air bubbles in within the mix.

The ‘top’ here will actually be the base of the planter. Smooth it out with a trowel or rubber concrete float, making sure not to cover the drain (this face won’t be visible, so don’t worry about making it too perfect).

A person uses a trowel to flatten the surface and smooth the surface of concrete in a large container.

Step 10

After letting your planters dry for 48 hours, take them out of the molds! You can cut the cardboard away with a utility knife, and then the mold should just peel off pretty easily by hand. 

A container of Quik-Tube building forms.
That’s it! Your planter is done. If there are any rough or sharp edges, you can knock them down with a bit of hand sanding. 
DIY tube concrete planter
DIY large planter made of cement
A vase lying on top of a table cloth with yellow flowers in it.
Two vase lying on top of a table cloth having plants in them.

We love how our planters turned out. They’re crazy heavy, which makes them hard to move around, but perfect for an outdoor, public location. Once we get them into place, we’ll be ready to move on to our next office transformation DIY project: custom-printed window signage!

A green thick plant in a round stone planter.
A yellow and green plant in a gray planter.

This post was sponsored by Quikrete, but all opinions are mine alone. Thanks for supporting the brands help that make Curbly possible.